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Van Dyck is said to have visited on his way back both Paris and the Hague, but there is no evidence to support this.

He probably returned straight to Antwerp, and if no longer willing to act as an assistant to Rubens, It may have been during the next few months that he painted the various copies from Rubens, to which allusion has been made In a former chapter.

Portraits, too, were no doubt greatly in demand. Scandal has not hesitated to suggest, on the slightest possible grounds, that the charming young painter seemed to Rubens to be too much of an attraction to the lively Isabella, and that for that reason Rubens did his best to hasten the projected journey of Van Dyck to Italy.

Rubens was himself about to start, if he had not already done so, for that journey to Paris which resulted In the famous series of paintings done for Queen Marie de Medicis m the Palais de Luxembourg.

The two painters parted on affectionate terms. Van Dyck painted a portrait of hirnself and Rubens together, which he presented to his master, m addition to the portrait of Isabella Brant and other paintings from his hand.

Rubens in return Is said to have given to Van Dyck the best horse in his stables, and Rubens was no mean judge of horses.

P :hi! H' Pt' axj v. IS sa;H Pto ;;:'i;ip;Lp. They spent a few days at Brussels, and thence proceeded to Genoa, where they arrived on N ovember 2 1 follow- ing.

Genoa ranked with Venice and Antwerp among the great maritime centres of commercial activity. Both at Genoa and at Venice there was a large colony of merchants from the Netherlands and Germany.

Many young artists, who found their native city overstocked with men as competent or more successful than them- selves, thought it profitable to remove to some place like Genoa, where they would find a sufficient number of their compatriots to insure employment and reward.

Among the Flemish artists who had settled in Genoa were two brothers, Lucas and Gornelis deWael, sons of the painter, Hans de Wael, and Gertruyt de Jode, the friends with whom Van Dyck had been so intimate in his youth.

His early comrade, Jan Brueghel, the younger, either accompanied Van Dyck to Genoa, or was already residing there when he arrived.

Rubens had spent some time at Genoa about twenty years before, and the memory of his presence there would insure a hearty welcome to one so strongly recommended by Rubens as Van Dyck.

Among his compatriots, therefore. Van Dyck would feel himself to be no stranger in Italy. His mind was already full of the wondrous creations of Titian and Paolo Veronese, which he had seen in the house of Rubens.

His impressionable nature lent itself readily to the influence of Italy and Italian art. The patricians and merchant princes of Genoa provided in their palaces plenty of material for the youthful artist to study and admire.

Although it was the ambition of Van Dyck to excel as a painter of history, and the journey to Italy was undertaken with this object, it may be imagined with reason that it was by portrait painting that he obtained the ways and means for prosecuting his travels and his studies.

During his first short stay at Genoa he probably painted some of those portraits of his fellow-countrymen, which combine the true and unmistakable manner of the Flemish school with something of the noble dignity and rich colouring of the Italians.

It is possible that some of the portraits alluded to in a previous chapter may have been done in Genoa, such as the portrait of a lady, belonging to the Earl of Denbigh, and the lady and child, belonging to Earl Brownlow, for the latter picture was purchased in Genoa by Sir Abraham Hume.

The portraits of 25 E ANTHONY VAN DYCK M. Vinck, mentioned before, are on a scale and conceived in a manner different from that of the usual Flemish school.

They may be compared with the two large and important portraits, said to be those of one Bartolommeo Giustiniani and his wife, with whom Van Dyck is said to have lodged on his first arrival at Genoa.

These two portraits were brought from Genoa with others in by Mr. Edouard Andrd at Paris, which like the others mentioned combines a somewhat homely vigour, almost like that of Jordaens, with the calm solemnity of a Titian.

Before entering into any further inquiry as to the paintings executed by Van Dyck at Genoa and elsewhere in Italy, it will be of assistance to try to trace his actual wanderings.

They would seem to have been traced, with some degree of certainty, by Cavaliere Mario Menotti, although his conclusions are not entirely in con- sonance with those handed down by Bellori and writers of an earlier date.

According to Cavaliere Menotti, Van Dyck would appear to have left Genoa in February, , and gone by sea to Civita Vecchia on his way to Rome.

The Eternal City, Urbs as it was known to fame, was still the goal for artists of every description. Van Dyck, however, like his master, resisted the temptation to waste his time in academical studies from Raphael and Michel- angelo.

Rome, therefore, afforded him but little attraction, and he soon left for Florence. At Florence he found an old friend of his boyhood, J ustus Suttermans, who had been entered as a boy-pupil in the Guild of St.

Luke at Antwerp on the same day as Van Dyck. Van Dyck probably met a man, who had a strong and peculiarinfluence on him later on in life, namely, that strange English- 26 VISIT TO ROME man, Sir Kenelm Digby.

From Florence Van Dyck went to Bologna, where he was introduced to the great schools of the eclectic painters, and found in the studied graces and elaborate artifices of Guido Reni and the Carracci much that was fascinating and stimulating to a would-be rival of Rubens.

From Bologna he went to Venice, which may be imagined to be the goal that he most desired to reach. Here he found his former patroness, Alethea, Countess of Arundel, residing for the education of her two sons.

Van Dyck was now in the home of Titian, Tintoretto, and Paolo Veronese, and the painter, who could pass through the Sistine Chapel or the Stanze of the Vatican unmoved, now spent several months in zealous and unremitting study of the paintings which had loomed so long and so largely on the horizon of his mind.

When finally he quitted Venice, he visited Mantua, and recalled to the court of the Gonzagas the splendid memory of Rubens and his residence with them.

In the Palazzo Sauli- Visconti at Fork there is a portrait of Marchesa Bulgarini of Mantua attributed to the hand of Van Dyck.

Rome was a perfect caravanserai of artists. They came and went, some mere birds of passage, like modern tourists, others to spend a fixed period of serious work and study, others with no very definite aim, except that of retailing from the great masterpieces there some copies or reminiscences of the works of art which they so greatly admired and so often failed to comprehend.

The artists from the Netherlands had a social circle of their own, and they brought with them the habits of the north, the jovial and noisy good fellowship of the tavern, the coarse and careless relations with the female sex, and other social amenities, which assorted but ill with the venerable ruins of Imperial Rome, or the refined splendour of the Papal surroundings.

Van Dyck, as a Fleming, was welcomed as a new boon 27 ANTHONY VAN DYCK companion, but when they found that the elegant and languid youth, still beardless, with his fine clothes, a curled feather in his velvet cap, a gold chain round his neck, two or three servants in his train, looked down upon them as vulgar roisterers, and shunned the tavern for the palace, and the society of his compatriot artists for that of cardinals and princes, they turned on him, and partly from jealousy of his undoubted skill as a painter, partly from the undisguised contempt which this superior young man showed for their society, they determined to make life as unpleasant for him at Rome as possible, and succeeded in their object.

The pittor cavallcresco, as they nicknamed him, is all very well as an elegant young popinjay ; he can cringe to a cardinal, they said, and kiss the hand of a princess, but he can neither draw nor paint.

In spite of all proofs to the contrary, such as the magnificent and famous portrait of Cardinal Bentivoglio, now in the Pitti Gallery at Florence, life at Rome was made intolerable to Van Dyck, and shaking off the dust of the Eternal City, he returned to Genoa, where he was more likely to be able to live and paint as he desired.

This is a sketch- book, obviously used by the painter in Italy, and containing very few original compositions, but chiefly his studies and reminiscences of the great Italian masters.

This little book was once in the possession of Sir Peter Lely, and, after passing through various hands and undergoing unexpected vicissitudes of ownership, it now remains in the collection of the Duke of Devonshire at Chatsworth.

A companion volume, similar in size and full of drawings of a rather similar nature, reveals itself on inspection to be the work of Daniel van den Dyck, a painter and engraver of a later date and mediocre quality.

The ascription of this second sketch-book to the great painter is an obvious supercherie, not necessarily to be traced to the said Van den Dyck himself.

It contains notes taken at Milan, Genoa, Rome, Venice, and elsewhere, and many of the paintings recorded by him remain to this day among the most famous masterpieces of painting.

He painted two fine portraits of these remarkable people which are now in the collection of Lord Leconfield at Petworth. He buys 29 ANTHONY VAN DYCK engravings by Albrecht Diirer and others, or sketches those he meets with in other collections.

Giorgione, Sebastiano del Piombo, Pordenone, and others claim his attention from time to time. He sketches figures from daily life in Venice.

But it is Titian who dominates the whole sketch-book, Pensieri di Titiano occur throughout, the only painter at all coming near him in importance being Paolo Veronese.

Titian at Genoa, Titian at Rome, Titian at Venice, it is always Titian at whose feet the young painter places himself in adoration.

H is time at Venice seems to have been spent in the study of paintings by Titian and Paolo Veronese. Peter by Pope Alexander VI.

On examining the later paintings by Van Dyck, especially those taken from sacred history, it is easily perceived to what an extent Van Dyck was indebted to these notes from Titian and Paolo Veronese for certain motives in his future work.

In three cases the question is one of peculiar interest, as it refers to certain paintings which are usually ranked among the early and more youthful works of Van Dyck.

In the Chatsworth sketch-book there is a drawing of the same composition, which is stated to be after Titian. Although it is not impossible that Van Dyck may have seen such a transcript in the collection of Rubens, it is not likely that he would have troubled to note the picture it he had already painted the same subject three times.

The Madrid version is usually reckoned to be the painting of the same subject which Rubens received as a present from Van Dyck before he left Antwerp for Italy, and which he valued so highly as to give it a special place of honour in his house.

A further rendering of the same subject on the lines of the sketch-book drawing is preserved in a drawing at Weimar, which appears to be that etched by Pieter Soutman.

This composition, which is full of passion and dramatic vigour, is certainly based on a similar composition by Titian.

This is further borne out by the occurrence in the Chatsworth sketch-book of various transcripts from the figure of the suffering Redeemer noted by Van Dyck as by Titian.

In the painting at Berlin the figure of a Roman or Gallic soldier is introduced, a reminiscence of the series of paintings representing the history of the Consul Decius.

This figure is removed in the painting at Madrid, which is in every way superior. The painting at Berlin came with two others from the Abbaye de Dunes near Bruges, and had originally belonged to a convent of Brigittine nuns at Hoboken.

It cannot, therefore, be identical with a version of the same picture, which is said to have come originally from the Balbi palace at 31 ANTHONY VAN DYCK Genoa to the Netherlands, and may with some reason be thought to have been painted by Van Dyck at Genoa, and repeated in later years, perhaps for Philip IV.

The same observations may be made upon a painting which through a certain flavour of romance has become one of the most famous creations of Van Dyck and one of the most puzzling and oft-debated questions in his career.

Until quite recent years a legend had been accepted that the handsome and impressionable young Van Dyck had on leaving Antwerp for Italy stopped at the village of Saventhem, near Brussels, where he had become enamoured of a young maiden of great beauty called Anna van Ophem.

So strong was his passion that he lingered there until Rubens sent messengers to extricate Van Dyck from these toils, and despatch him to Italy.

Before leaving Saventhem, as the story goes. But modern criticism has destroyed its credibility. Apart from the fact now ascertained that Van Dyck left Antwerp in October, , and arrived at Genoa some six or seven weeks later, documentary evidence connected with the commune of Saventhem has revealed that the paintings were commissioned at a much later date by Ferdinand de Bois- schot, Comte d Erps and Seigneur de Saventhem, a distinguished statesman and diplomat.

As in the two previous cases there are at least two separate versions of this painting, one at Saventhem, the other, amplified and matured, in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle, where it still hangs as the work of Rubens.

A small painting which appears to be a preliminary sketch is in the collection of Captain Holford at Dorchester House.

In all these pictures the graceful figure of the youthful saint is the same with some slight variations in the attitude.

Kf 'i f. Stopped at th. In ail these pictures the I tnc y ii:;;.. MARTIN In the Saventhem picture the number of figures is reduced so as to concentrate the motive of the picture upon the saint and the beggar.

In the Windsor picture more figures are added, improving the decorative qualities of the painting but losing somewhat in dramatic effect.

The figure of the beggar is also evidently taken from an Italian model, and it occurs with but slight variations in other paintings by Van Dyck.

It it difficult to believe that the Saventhem painting was not an early work by Van Dyck, done in I taly, and, perhaps, forwarded to Ferdinand de Boisschot to celebrate his elevation from Seigneur to Baron de Saventhem in , and his entry into the commune.

Martin rides in Capt. It may seem remarkable that the young painter, who was to receive such conspicuous honour from the magnates at Rome and Genoa, should have left so few traces of his stay, and received so little patronage from the wealthy and art-loving senators and patricians in the city of the lagoons.

Perhaps an important historical event may account for this deficiency. In May, , the Republic of Venice was convulsed by the news of an internal plot against its independence.

Foscarini, one of the leading senators, who had been ambassador to England, was accused of treason with a view to the betrayal of the Republic, and, on what afterwards were proved to be baseless charges, was executed as a criminal.

It so happened that Alethea, Countess of Arundel, who has been mentioned before, a lady of imperious rank and dignity, was residing at the time in Venice for the education of her sons.

Suspicion fell upon her for her intercourse with F oscarini, and she was accused of arranging interviews at her house between Foscarini and the Secretaiy to the Spanish Embassy.

To such a pitch were the popular passions excited, that the Countess of Arundel insisted that Sir Henry Wotton, the English ambassador, should obtain a public apology from the Venetian government, which was given her with compensation for the insults and injuries which she had received.

Van Dyck, as has already been stated, was the devoted servant and admirer of this haughty dame. During his stay at Venice, he was probably devoted to her party, if not actually a resident in her house.

This would have been sufficient in itself to deprive him of any patronage from the great Venetian families, and it is not surprising to learn that his position there brought him into financial straits.

The Countess of Arundel, delayed a few months by the illness of her younger son, quitted Venice for England, and it is not improbable that Van Dyck followed in her train, travelling by Mantua and Milan to Turin, where the countess certainly was on January 4th, Tradition has recorded that Van Dyck was strongly pressed by the Countess of Arundel to accompany her to England, but that he refused to leave Italy.

Although so near to Genoa, he seems to have returned at once to Rome. Perhaps his speedy return was accelerated by the interest in him shown by some of the high dignitaries of the Church, who belonged to the leading families of the country.

The portrait of Bentivoglio, which Van Dyck painted in , now in the Pitti Palace at Florence, is the first which raises Van Dyck from the rank of mere first-rate painters to that in which artists stand apart, unapproachable in their own particular line of art.

Seated in his high armchair, in his robes of scarlet and white rochet, his head turned in an attitude of expectant attention, the Cardinal is the very embodiment of the crafty Italian statesmen, that were nurtured in the bosom of the Roman Church.

It is not uninteresting to quote the impression made by this portrait upon a young English painter, J onathan Richardson, the younger, early in the eighteenth century.

He sits in an Elbow Chair with one of his Elbows upon the Arm of the Chair and his Hand the most Beautiful and Graceful in the World falls carelessly in his Lap by the other, which most unaffectedly gathers up his Rochet, which is painted Beautifully, but keeps down so as not to break the Harmony.

Cardinal Barberini afterwards Pope Urban VIII. Portrait-painting was, however, not in such great demand at Rome as large paintings of sacred subjects, or of mythology and classical history, in which Van Dyck could only compete on equal grounds with other artists in the Holy City.

Richardson, sen. London, Careful research would doubtless reveal the existence of other paintings by Van Dyck at Rome belonging to the Roman period of his career; but several paintings which bear his name at present at Rome, Florence, Lucca, and elsewhere in Italy have to be regarded with great suspicion.

Van Dyck, especially after his stay at Genoa, found many imitators. At Rome he met and painted his fellow-countryman, the sculptor Fran9ois Duquesnoy, known as Fiammingo, a portrait which now belongs to the King of the Belgians.

The intrigues, as stated before, of his brother-artists drove Van Dyck from Rome; and he returned to Genoa, where he was among friends, and where he settled, as it would appear, for a residence of some four years.

Van Dyck had now reached his full maturity as a painter. Steeped in the manner and method of Rubens and Titian, he evolved from these a style, at all events in his portraits, which was and remains still entirely his own.

The series of portraits painted by Van Dyck at Genoa are among the finest in the world, and would in themselves have been sufficient to give the painter a place among the immortals.

Genoa was not at the moment in a very settled state, as it was more or less at war with the neighbouring state of Savoy, and was besides continually being racked by the contests between the great families of Doria and Spinola for supre- macy in the city.

But these troubles did not reach so far as Van Dyck, or enter into the sacred portals of Art. Few actual details can be ascertained of the second sojourn of Van Dyck in Genoa.

He appeared to have lived with or near 36 of St. Stepk' 'Hii, and to - i. Careful c. One fioie of Van Dyck's dedication ot.

Dgge, a - r. Among the Flemish residents from Antwerp was a rich merchant, Lucas van Uffel, an ardent and generous patron of the arts.

Up to the end of the last century the descendants of Van Uffel preserved a number of letters that passed between Van Uffel and Cornells de Wael, in which Van Dyck was frequently mentioned.

These have unfortunately disappeared. Van Dyck has, however, im- mortalized Van Uffel in the admirable portrait of him which is in the collection of the Duke of Sutherland at Stafford House, and perhaps again in the fine portrait of a man with his hand on a stick in the gallery at Brunswick.

Among the artists at Genoa was Giambattista Paggi, a friend and correspondent of Rubens, with whom Van Dyck was on particularly friendly terms.

Letters passed between the two painters until the death of Paggi in , when the letters passed into the possession of Stefano Magnasco, another painter, after which all trace of them is lost.

Paggi was but one of a flourishing colony of artists at Genoa. The Genoese School does not rank among the highest or the most original ; but in Bernardo Strozzi, Paggi, il Grechetto, and others it attained a sufficiently high rank to claim attention.

Among the Flemish artists settled at Genoa was one Jan Roos of Antwerp, an animal-painter and a former pupil of Snyders, who was filled with such admiration for the works of his brilliant young compatriot that he abandoned his own independent painting, in order that he might become a humble assistant to Van Dyck.

Another Antwerp painter, Michel of Antwerp, as he was known, after serving in a similar capacity, went to Spain, where he found employment, and thrived on his reminiscences of Van Dyck.

He made good use of it. Retaining throughout life his aspirations to succeed as a painter of history, to be the rival of Titian and Rubens, he now gave fair play to his own supreme and unrivalled genius, and produced that series of portraits of the Genoese nobility, which not only rank among the finest paintings in the world, but also form in themselves one of the landmarks in the history of painting, certainly in that of portraiture.

To show how great was his industry, it is recorded by the painter. Of these paintings many remain, though several have left their original homes, having been trans- ported for the most part to England in the early years of the nineteenth century by the agency of Andrew Wilson, Buchanan, and other pioneers of the modern trade of picture-dealing.

It may be noted that most of the paintings of Van Dyck in English col- lections, apart from those actually executed by him in England, came from Italy, and but few from the Netherlands.

It is difficult to find language in which to describe the effect produced by this wonderful series of paintings. Van Dyck has shown himself in his earlier portraits to be not only a complete master of construction and modelling when painting a head, but also a keen and incisive interpreter of character.

On arriving in Italy he blended his vigorous Flemish style with the suave dignity of the Italians. But now at Genoa he at once entrances the world with a series of portraits which are not only graceful and sympathetic in themselves, but are thoroughly imbued with the character of their subjects, the circum- stances of their lives, and the atmosphere by which they were sur- rounded.

As Mr. From the Genoese portraits of Van Dyck date a whole class of portraits in every country in Europe, and the effect of them is still felt at the very close of the nineteenth century.

Taking the portraits as they come, the most familiar to those who visit Genoa are those of the Brignole-Sala family, in their palace, which is now public property and known as the Palazzo Rosso.

He is bareheaded, with rich dark hair, slight moustache, with that wistful look of melancholy in the eyes which is so characteristic of Van Dyck and his works.

In his hand the beautiful young cavalier holds his black plumed hat, saluting the spectator with a noble dignity, such as is the appanage of high birth and breeding alone.

Turning from him, the eye encounters the graceful figure of his wife, Paola Adorno, pacing slowly through the colonnade of her palace, clad in heavy blue robes, weighty with gold embroidery, her little head almost overwhelmed by the great gold-edged ruff, her hand falling easily by her side, as she turns to look at the spectator before passing on her way.

N othing could be more simple and unaffected, more aristocratic and more dignified. The same fair Marchesa Brignole-Sala is depicted in a very similar portrait, belonging to the Duke of Abercorn at Hampden House in London.

H ere the lovely Paola stands in the same attitude, but the colonnade has been replaced by a plain background with a curtain drawn athwart it.

The difference in the background serves to enhance the value of her splendid robes, which are now white and gold, while her left hand, no longer idle, draws back a fold of the silk, and breaks the surface into one of coruscating sheen.

In the portrait at Genoa the lady is not only dignified but vivacious ; in that of the Duke of Abercorn her dignity is statuesque.

Gontem- porary gossip, crystallized into tradition, suggests an undue influence exercised by the chivalrous young painter on the heart of the fair Marchesa.

Happy lady, happy painter, even if the link between them were not one of love, that they should both be rendered im- mortal by the same magic touch of Art!

In the same palace, depicted with the same dignity and splendour, stands another lady, the Marchesa Geronima Brignole- Sala, in dark robes, with her daughter, a girl in white and gold, standing by her side.

The lady only yields in beauty and interest to the fair Paola Adorno. Glose by stands a youth in rich brocaded dress, a mere boy with a smooth face, the rich and tender lips of a child, but animated with all the fire and dignity of a mediaeval ccnidottiere.

Another lady of the same family has been traced in the fine seated portrait of a lady with a child at Warwick Gastle. Yet another member of the Brignole-Sala family is said to be depicted in the elegant and graceful man who leans against a 40 ANTHONY VAN DYCK iVi white collar, like the with rich dark hair,!.

Nothing could be more simple a, ore a istocratlc and more dignified. The same ' iffri'i! I' colonnade PAOLA ADORNO,.

The type of head, however, in these two portraits with its crisp reddish hair is hardly Italian, and certainly not one that would be expected to occur in the family of Brignole-Sala.

They suggest a family of a more northern descent. In the Palazzo Reale there is a portrait of the Marchesa Gaterina Durazzo, which in pose, costume, and dignity approaches near to those of the Brignole-Sala family.

The proud lady rests her graceful hand on the edge of a marble fountain, a motive to be handed down by Van Dyck and his followers through hundreds of repetitions.

Gaterina Durazzo was the wife of Gian Battista Adorno, the brother of Paola, and is represented again in the Palazzo Durazzo, seated with her two sons.

Spinola, both as a man and as a general, seems to have thoroughly deserved all the praise and glory which he earned from his con- temporaries, and to have been worthy of his high place in military annals and in the history of Europe.

He had been painted by Rubens, and his many victories had been recorded on canvas by Pieter Snayers and other military artists. The Spinola family was one of the greatest in Genoa, second only and actual rivals to that of Doria.

Van Dyck was busy with their portraits. He painted the illustrious general at full-length in armour, in the great portrait which passed from the Spinola family to that of Centurione, in whose palace it now hangs.

A bust portrait of the great Spinola, admirably painted, is in the collection of M. Rodolphe Kann at Paris. By his wife, Giovanna Basadonna, Spinola had a son, Filippo, who was united in marriage to Geronima, daughter of Paolo Doria, procurator of the Republic.

Van Dyck painted the young couple in their youthful beauty, but their portraits have been dispersed. That of Geronima has passed recently from the family of De Fornari, who inherited it, into the 41 G ANTHONY VAN DYCK collection of M.

That of Filippo Spinola quitted Genoa early in the century, and may surely be discovered in the splendid young warrior, depicted in the portrait belonging to the Earl of Hopetoun, at Hopetoun House, near Edinburgh.

Ambrogio and Giovanna Spinola also had a beautiful daughter, Polissena, who found a husband in the proud Don Diego Filippo Guzman, Marchese di Leganez, ambassador from Philip IV.

Van Dyck painted Polissena Spinola more than once ; one of these portraits passed to Spain, and is now in the Prado Gallery at Madrid, another, more beautiful still, adorns the Galleria Doria in her native town.

A portrait of Polissena and her husband together has disappeared, but a fine full-length portrait of the proud grandee, Leganez, is among the fine works by Van Dyck in the collection of Earl Cowper at Panshanger.

Closely allied to the Spinolas was the family of Balbi, and some of the most charming portraits by Van Dyck are of the Balbi family. The last group, which may represent three children of the Spinola family, as it came from the Spinolas to the Balbi family, is one of the most charming presentations of aristocratic child life, such as was never produced even by a Velazquez, a Sir Joshua Reynolds, or a Romney.

The children are standing in easy attitudes outside the portico of their palace, and are surrounded by their pet animals. Another great family in Genoa was that of Lomellini, noteworthy 42 - Andrew Wilson, early in the nineteenth century.

A certain family likeness with a bushy-haired young warrior in this group would lead one to believe that the graceful and elegant young man painted by Van Dyck in the Wallace collection at Hertford House may be a member of the Lomellini family.

Van Dyck painted the Doge Pallavicini and other members of that family, and also members of the Raggi family. One of the gracious ladies who sat to him for their portraits was Antonio Demarini, wife of the Doge Francesco Lercari.

Her portrait at whole length is in the Palazzo Reale at Genoa, and another portrait of her has been seen by Cavaliere Menotti in the palace of the Marchesa Paola Imperiale Lercari at Modena.

The family of Imperiale was as important as its name would seem to denote. Das ist mittlerweile anders und macht mich durchaus an.

Ich breche ja auch gar nicht wirklich seinen Willen, sondern helfe ihm ja nur, dass er das schafft, was er eigentlich will.

Im Moment finde ich unser Toiletten-Spezial toll, welches wir mit drei Kolleginnen gemeinsam im Studio LUX anbieten. Es geht dabei darum, dass jemand nur Toilette sein will und nichts anderes.

Seine Aufgabe ist es, für die Notdurft aller Damen im Studio zur Verfügung zu stehen. Was gehört zu einer gelungenen KV-Session? Und wie ich selber zum Kaviar kam Johannas DOMINA-BLOG.

Diese Variante kommt allerdings recht selten vor. Ach, ich liebe das!!!! Dienstag, Email or Username.

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Ignatius of Antioch Episcopal Church Choir of St. Ryan Endris R. Senatirev V. Sokhiev Tugan Sokolov Grigory Sol Dohyo Solaesa Adalberto M.

Sorichetti Alfredo Sorokin Pavel Sorokoletova Alla Sorokow Anton Sorozabal Pablo Sorrel Quartet Sosa Julio Sosa Mercedes Sosa Patricia Sotin Hans Soto Amilcar Souad Cheba Soudant Hubert Soustrot Marc Southerland Daniel F.

Clair Carl St. Tchuev A. Meg Duffy. Produced by Jack Howson. WEDNESDAY 20 MARCH WED Through the Night mddx Handel's Aci, Galatea e Polifemo A dramatic cantata from the early s; Il Giardino Armonico, conducted by Giovanni Antonini.

Piazzolla moved to Paris in to study with one of the most renowned teachers of the age, Nadia Boulanger. Lento-Tranquillo Danza.

In today's recital pianist Leon McCawley performs Schumann's Abegg Variations, a set of theme and variations with a musical motif based on the name "Abegg" - a fictitious friend of the composer.

Then the London Haydn Quartet perform Mozart's String Quartet in D K. Presented by Kate Molleson Schoenberg: Verklarte Nacht Brahms: Symphony No.

Introit: O Lorde, the maker of al thing Joubert Responses: Clucas Psalms 47, 48 Goss, Turle First Lesson: Job 1 vv. Romanian cellist Andrei Ionita - hailed as 'probably the leading cellist of his generation'- is heard in a suite by Bach from his long-awaited debut release.

Also today, Scottish mezzo soprano, Catriona Morison sings Schumann's melancholic Poems of Mary Stuart in a performance she gave at last year's Edinburgh International Festival.

Bach Suite no. We also hear from the Calidore String Quartet who take part in the Tetbury Chamber Music Festival which runs from the 22nd to the 24th March.

And Syrian-Palestinian pianist Aeham Ahmad became known after he dragged his piano in to the rubble of the bombed out streets of his neighbourhood of Yarmouk near Damascus; he joins us in the studio ahead of the publishing of his memoir: The Pianist of Yarmouk.

WED In Tune Mixtape mcy0 In Tune's specially curated playlist: an eclectic mix of music, featuring favourites, lesser-known gems, and a few surprises.

Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis 8. It is heard in its complete form three times and serves as the source for a wonderful miasma of variants and developments in this rich orchestral composition written for a large string orchestra divided into three parts.

Although it is not specifically religious music, it seems to speak to the spirit. WED Free Thinking mcy6 Empathy Authors Max Porter, Samantha Harvey and Alisdair Benjamin discuss empathy and the role it plays in writing and reading.

How does it work? Is it the same in fiction and non-fiction? And how is it faring in a world where data sometimes seems to have replaced feeling.

Chris Harding talks to all three about their latest books, Lanny, Let Me Not be Mad and the Western Wind in his search for answers.

Let Me Not Be Mad by the neuropsychologist AK Benjamin is out now. Max Porter's second novel is called Lanny. His first, Grief is the Thing with Feathers, has now been turned into a stage production featuring Cillian Murphy which runs at the Barbican from 25 Mar—13 Apr Samantha Harvey's latest novel The Western Wind - set in a C15th Somerset village - is now out in paperback.

Her previous books include The Wilderness - which depicts an architect suffering from Alzheimers who is attempting to order his memories.

Producer: Zahid Warley WED Mabinogi mcyb Part Three Adapted by Lucy Catherine From the Red Book of Hergest, these are the tales of the Mabinogi.

Third episode of a new fantasy adventure series, based on the iconic work of medieval Welsh mythology. Pryderi and Brigid uncover the otherworldly power of the magic cauldron.

But will it be enough to placate the Irish? Stephen Hogan Arawn…. John Cording Nysien…. Tonight he has thirty minutes of the programme to create and curate a bespoke audio reality, through his Late Junction Mixtape.

Thematically the mix explores notions of the ocean, and the tracks come together to create something simultaneously sublime and frightening.

THURSDAY 21 MARCH THU Through the Night mcyl Beethoven and Schubert from Berlin Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra play Beethoven's 8th Symphony and Schubert's 9th, 'Great'.

Luik author Sugismaastikud Autumn landscapes Eesti Raadio Segakoor , Toomas Kapten conductor am Fredrik Pacius Overture from the Hunt of King Charles Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Jukka-Pekka Saraste conductor am Louis Moreau Gottschalk Ricordati Op 26 No 1 Michael Lewin piano am Carl Friedrich Abel Trio in F major for 2 flutes and continuo Karl Kaiser flute , Michael Schneider flute , Rainer Zipperling cello , Harald Hoeren harpsichord am Tomaso Albinoni Concerto a 5 for 2 oboes and strings Op 9 No 9 in C major European Union Baroque Orchestra, Roy Goodman conductor am Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky Dumka, Op 59 'Russian rustic scene' Duncan Gifford piano am Johannes Ockeghem c.

A heart attack and the loss of funding for his band encouraged Piazzolla to seek new pastures. Together with his partner, the tango singer Amelita Baltar, he set up shop in the Eternal City.

A new deal with an agent, and some interesting projects beckoned, yet Piazzolla would later describe these years as being full of bad memories.

Beginning with music by Brahms, and his Klavierstücke Op. Then a new commission from the festival from Northern Irish composer Deirdre Gribbin and her piece written for the Amatis Trio - "After the Eagle.

THU Afternoon Concert mc6l Verdi's Aida with Liudmyla Monastyrska Verdi's mighty Egyptian opera, Aida is a tale of jealousy, love, betrayal and patriotic fervour.

This highly-strung brew of visceral passions is one of Verdi's greatest and most popular works. Starring Violeta Urmana, Liudmyla Monastyrska and Gregory Kunde this performance from the Teatro Real Madrid is conducted by Nicola Luisotti.

The afternoon ends with Mendelssohn's Ruy Blas from the Ulster Orchestra under Andrew Gourlay. Presented by Kate Molleson Verdi: Aida Aida Liudmyla Monastyrska Soprano Radames Gregory Kunde Tenor Amneris Violeta Urmana Mezzo-soprano Ramfis Roberto Tagliavini Bass Amonasro George Gagnidze Baritone The King of Egypt Soloman Howard Bass Voice of High Priestess Sandra Pastrana Soprano Messenger

Der Kv Domina KeuLn Stripklub. - Posts Tagged ‘köln’

Es ist nicht gratis dafür aber hammermässig geil. A noble head of Snyders alone is in the Liechtenstein Gallery at Vienna. Luke at Antwerp, an unusual distinction for so young a man. It sub sex tube be conjectured that the family put some pressure upon the painter to return to Antwerp and settle the family affairs, which must have caused them considerable inconvenience while unsettled. It would seem that Van Dyck sent out from Genoa many paintings of this character. These families were closely related by marriage ties. On examining the later paintings by Van Dyck, especially those taken from sacred history, it is easily perceived to what an extent Van Dyck was indebted to these notes from Titian and Paolo Veronese for certain motives in his future work. It should be noted that Cornells de Vos was brother to Paul de Vos, the animal-painter, and to Mar- garetha, the wife of Frans Snyders; and also that his own wife was step-sister to Jan Wildens, the landscape-painter, a friend and fellow-pupil of Van Dyck: so that Cornells de Vos may be reckoned among the circle of friends and acquaintances Alexis Texas Xvideos whom Van Dyck was brought up. As war between Wales and Ireland breaks out, Pryderi, Prince of Dyfed, joins the fleet Kv Domina KeuLn the Kingdom of Gwynedd to rescue Princess Branwen. Van Dyck may have been disappointed at the employment given Riesigen Arsch teen wird gebohrt by the king. This influence is shown in the very earliest historical paintings by Van Dyck, some of which he is credited with having completed before he entered the studio of Rubens. From Bologna he went to Venice, which may be imagined to be the goal that he most desired to reach.

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